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Oligofructose Buy Uk


Although convincing lipid-lowering effects of the fructo-oligosaccharide, inulin, have been demonstrated in animals, attempts to reproduce similar effects in man have produced conflicting findings. This may be because of the much lower doses which can be used due to the adverse gastrointestinal symptoms exhibited by most subjects consuming in excess of 15 g/d. There are nine studies reported in the literature which have investigated the response of blood lipids (usually total and LDL-cholesterol and triacylglycerol) to inulin or oligofructose supplementation in human volunteers. Three have observed no effects of inulin or oligofructose on blood levels of cholesterol or triacylglycerol, three have shown significant reductions in triacylglycerol, whilst four have shown modest reductions in total and LDL-cholesterol. Studies have been conducted in both normo- and moderately hyperlipidaemic subjects. Differences in study outcomes do not appear to be due to differences in the type or dose of oligosaccharides used nor the duration of the studies. Because animal studies have identified inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis as the major site of action for the triacylglycerol lowering effects of inulin and oligofructose, and because this pathway is relatively inactive in man unless a high carbohydrate diet is fed, variability in response may be a reflection of differences in background diet or the experimental foods used.




oligofructose buy uk



Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients that target certain components within the microbiota of the human large intestine. Efficient prebiotics need to have a specific fermentation therein and thereby have the ability to alter the faecal microflora composition towards a more 'beneficial' community structure. This should occur by the stimulation of benign or potentially health promoting genera but not the harmful groups. Because of their positive attributes bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are the most frequent target organisms. Both inulin and oligofructose have been demonstrated to be effective prebiotics. This has been shown through both in vitro and in vivo assessments in different laboratories. Because of their recognised prebiotic properties, principally the selective stimulation of colonic bifidobacteria, both inulin and oligofructose are increasingly used in new food product developments. Examples include drinks, yoghurts, biscuits and table spreads. Because of the recognised inhibitory effects that bifidobacteria can exert against gut pathogens, one of the most important aspects of prebiotic ingestion is fortification of the gut flora to resist acute infections.


Inulin is a natural food component found in many plants that are part of the human diet (e.g., leeks, onions, wheat, garlic, chicory and artichokes). It is added to many foods and is used to increase dietary fibre, replace fats or carbohydrates, and as a prebiotic (a stimulant of beneficial bacteria in the colon). Oligofructose, which is also present in these foods, produces similar effects and most research has used a combination of these products. A previous study (Smith, 2005) investigated the effects of regular consumption of oligofructose-enriched inulin on wellbeing, mood, and cognitive performance in humans. The results showed that oligofructose-enriched inulin had no negative effects but that it did not improve wellbeing, mood, or performance. The aim of the present study was to examine the acute effects of oligofructose-enriched inulin (5 g) over a 4 h period during which the participants remained in the laboratory. A double blind placebo (maltodextrin) controlled study (N = 47) was carried out with the order of conditions being counterbalanced and the two sessions a week apart. On each test day mood and cognitive performance were assessed at baseline (at 8:00) and then following inulin or placebo (at 11:00). Prior to the second test session (at 10:30) participants completed a questionnaire assessing their physical symptoms and mental health during the test morning. The inulin and placebo were provided in powder form in 5 g sachets. Volunteers consumed one sachet in decaffeinated tea or decaffeinated coffee with breakfast (9:00). Questionnaire results showed that on the day that the inulin was consumed, participants felt happier, had less indigestion and were less hungry than when they consumed the placebo. As for performance and mood tasks, the most consistent effects were on the episodic memory tasks where consumption of inulin was associated with greater accuracy on a recognition memory task, and improved recall performance (immediate and delayed). Further research is required to identify the mechanisms that underlie this effect with glucose metabolism being one candidate.


Background & aims: Patients with diarrhoea during enteral nutrition (EN) have been shown to have low faecal bifidobacteria concentrations. Oligofructose/inulin selectively stimulate the growth of bifidobacteria in healthy humans. This study investigates the effect of additional oligofructose/inulin on the gastrointestinal microbiota, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and faecal output in patients receiving EN.


Methods: Adult patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who were starting EN with a formula containing fibre were randomised to receive 7 g/d of additional oligofructose/inulin or an identically packaged placebo (maltodextrin). A fresh faecal sample was collected at baseline and following at least 7 days of supplementation. Faecal microbiota were analysed using fluorescent in-situ hybridisation and faecal output was monitored daily.


Results: Twenty-two patients (mean age 71 years) completed at least 7 days of intervention (mean 12 days). At the end of the intervention, there were no significant differences in the concentrations of bifidobacteria between the groups, after adjusting for baseline values (oligofructose/inulin 6.9 + 1.4, placebo 7.8 + 1.3 log10 cells/g dry faeces, P > 0.05), but there were significantly lower concentrations of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (7.0 + 1.0 vs. 8.4 + 1.3 log10 cells/g, P = 0.01) and Bacteroides-Prevotella (9.1 + 1.0 vs. 9.9 + 0.9 log10 cells/g, P = 0.05) in patients receiving additional oligofructose/inulin. There were no differences in faecal concentrations of any SCFA, secretory IgA, daily faecal score or incidence of diarrhoea between the two groups.


Conclusions: Additional oligofructose/inulin did not increase faecal bifidobacteria in critically ill patients receiving EN, although it did result in lower concentrations of F. prausnitzii and Bacteroides-Prevotella. This trial is registered at -trials.com. Identifier: ISRCTN06446184.


Butyrate is an important substrate for maintenance of colonic health and oligofructose fermentation by human faecal bacteria can increase butyrate production in vitro. However, oligofructose appears to be fermented by mainly acetate and lactate-producing bacteria rather than butyrate-producing bacteria. Isotope labelling studies using [U-(13)C(6)]glucose were used to show that (13)C(2) and (13)C(4) were the major labelled butyrate species produced from glucose fermentation, via [(13)C(2)]acetate-acetyl CoA as intermediate. Bacterial interconversion reactions were quantified and acetate conversion to butyrate and lactate conversion to acetate, propionate and butyrate were observed. Addition of oligofructose to faecal batch cultures significantly increased butyrate production. Of the newly synthesised butyrate from oligofructose fermentation, 80 % was derived from interconversion of extracellular acetate and lactate, with acetate being quantitatively more significant. Carbohydrates, such as oligofructose, have prebiotic properties. In addition, oligofructose selectively stimulates the bacterial conversion of acetate and lactate to butyrate. Carbohydrates with similar properties represent a refinement of the prebiotic definition, termed butyrogenic prebiotics, because of their additional functionality.


Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) ActualEnrollment : 45 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor) Primary Purpose: Basic Science Official Title: A Randomised Controlled Trial of the Effect of the Low FODMAP Diet and Dietary Oligofructose on Gastrointestinal Form, Function and Microbiota in Healthy Volunteers Study Start Date : September 2014 Actual Primary Completion Date : December 2014 Actual Study Completion Date : December 2014 Arms and Interventions Go to Top of Page Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Arm Intervention/treatment Active Comparator: OligofructoseParticipants will be asked to follow the low FODMAP diet for a week, supplementing the diet with oligofructose, 7grams twice daily Behavioral: low FODMAP dietParticipants will attend a one-hour group session on how to follow the low FODMAP diet, run by a dietitian trained in the diet. They will be asked to follow the diet for 7 days while keeping a food diary. Dietary Supplement: OligofructoseParticipants will supplement their diet with 7 grams of OF twice daily for the week that they follow the low FODMAP diet.Other Name: OraftiP95, OF Placebo Comparator: MaltodextrinParticipants will be asked to follow the low FODMAP diet for a week, supplementing the diet with maltodextrin, 7grams twice daily Behavioral: low FODMAP dietParticipants will attend a one-hour group session on how to follow the low FODMAP diet, run by a dietitian trained in the diet. They will be asked to follow the diet for 7 days while keeping a food diary. Dietary Supplement: MaltodextrinParticipants will supplement their diet with 7 grams of maltodextrin twice daily for the week that they follow the low FODMAP diet. Outcome Measures Go to Top of Page Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Primary Outcome Measures : Change in colonic volume [ Time Frame: one week ]Percentage change from baseline in fasting colonic volume after one week of intervention, as measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Secondary Outcome Measures : Change in whole gut transit time [ Time Frame: one week ]Change in whole gut transit time (WGTT) after one week of intervention, as determined by Weighted Average Position Score (WAPS) of MRI transit markers 24 hours after ingestion Change in colonic gas volume [ Time Frame: one week ]Percentage change in fasting colonic gas volume after one week of intervention, as measured by MRI Change in fasting breath hydrogen [ Time Frame: one week ]Change in fasting breath hydrogen concentration after one week of intervention, measured in parts per million Change in fasting breath methane [ Time Frame: one week ]Change in fasting breath methane concentration after one week of intervention, measured in parts per million Other Outcome Measures: Change in urinary metabolites [ Time Frame: one week ]Exploratory work to assess change in urinary metabolite concentrations after one week of intervention Change in faecal microbiota [ Time Frame: one week ]Exploratory work to assess change in faecal microbiota concentrations after one week of intervention Change in faecal short-chain fatty acids [ Time Frame: one week ]Exploratory work to assess change in faecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations after one week of intervention Eligibility CriteriaGo to Top of Page Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Information from the National Library of Medicine Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies. Layout table for eligibility information Ages Eligible for Study: 18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult) Sexes Eligible for Study: All Accepts Healthy Volunteers: Yes Criteria Inclusion Criteria: 041b061a72


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